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Learning a new language should not be limited only to textbooks and homework, and we at Alegre Spanish Schools give you some ideas so that you can practice your Spanish in your day-to-day life.

Practice reading in Spanish

Change the language of your devices

Consider switching your phone, computer, tablet, Facebook profile, and whatever else you can, to the Spanish language. This is an easy way to practice Spanish, as you will see a lot of the context you always use, in the language you are trying to learn, and you will associate it faster.

For example, every time you look at your phone, you will see the date in Spanish, thus reinforcing the days of the week and the months of the year. Facebook will often ask you if you like to add friends, in this way you will know the verb add in English and its equivalent to Spanish.

Seeing some of the same words repeated constantly will help you become more familiar with the language.

Searches in Spanish

How many times a day do you Google something you needed to find? If you do a search, for example, on Wikipedia, use the Spanish version so that you can see the information offered in this version before you switch to the one shown in the English version. The same with any search you do, try to enter the Spanish versions and see how much you can understand.

Read newspapers in Spanish

In many cities you can find newspapers for free, and you can also find them on the internet. If you want to travel to Mexico or a Latin American country, visit a news site such as El Universal, Jornada, Reforma, etc., and read the information that is detailed there, this can help you practice your understanding of the language, as well as pronunciation. . In addition to practicing, you inform yourself about what is happening in the place you want to travel.

Read a book in Spanish

We recommend starting with youth reading or novels written by Latino authors that are popular and do not contain complex vocabulary. Or you can also start with poetry, which, despite being a bit complex, is short.

Another option you can do is buy a translated book, like the ones that exist for novels in English such as Harry Potter, the da Vinci code, etc. With these you will be able to compare the writing and the uses of different words.

Learn with games in Spanish

Since your game is set up in Spanish, many of the games in your store will appear in Spanish as well. Trivia games will help you to be faster to practice Spanish, since many of these are based on answering before the established time.

Learn Spanish with these greetings, ask for directions and order food.

It is not that difficult to make yourself understood in Spanish (many of the people who speak Spanish in Latin America and Europe are very nice when your pronunciation fails and they help you make yourself understood better). A combination of pantomime and basic Spanish words can help you travel in a country like Mexico. Please and thank you always go well, and if you have a book with some phrases, it would help you a lot too.

Greet people in Spanish

If you only plan to learn a phrase in Spanish, try to make it a way of greeting. Locals will always appreciate your effort to speak their language, so learning how to greet them will help you have a better time.

  • Hello: hola (oh-lah)
  • Good morning: Buenos días (bway-nos dee-ahs)
  • Good afternoon: Buenas tardes (bway-nahs tar-des)
  • Good evening: Buenas noches (bway-nahs noh-chess)
  • How are you?: ¿Cómo está? (coh-moh es-tah)
  • Good, thank you: Bien, gracias (bee-ehn, grah-see-ahs)
  • Can you speak English?: ¿Habla inglés? (hah-blah een-glays)

Ask for directions

As a traveler, some of the most common phrases you can learn are those that are related to asking for directions. Maybe you need to ask someone where a hotel is nearby, where the bathroom is located or where you can get some food, and of course, you will need to understand their answer as well.

  • Where is…?: ¿Dónde está…? (Dhohn-dheh ehs-TAH)
  • Where is a restaurant?: ¿Dónde hay un restaurante? (Dhohn-dheh eye oon rest-ore-rahn-tay)
  • Where is the restroom?: ¿Dónde está el baño? (Dhohn-dheh ehs-tah el ban-yo)
  • How far?: ¿A qué distancia? (Ah kay dhees-tan-syah)
  • Right: A la derecha (Ah lah dey-ray-chah) 
  • Left: A la izquierda (Ah lah eez-key-ayr-dah)
  • Ahead: Derecho (De-rey-choh)
  • Can you help me?: ¿Puede ayudarme? (Pweh-dhe ah-yoo-dh-ahr-meh)
  • Please: Por favor (por fav-ore)
  • Thank you: Gracias (gra-see-uhs)

Eat in a restaurant

When you are not asking locals for directions, maybe it is because you are asking for food and drinks in restaurants. After all, you will find the best food in places where they don’t have the English menu for tourists, trust us. Learn the basics in restaurants and you will be able to enjoy the best food you have ever tried on your travels.

  • How much is it?: ¿Cuanto cuesta? (Kwahn-toh kweh-stah)
  • The bill, please: La cuenta, por favor (Lah kwhen-tah, por-fav-ore)
  • That was delicious: Estuvo delicioso (est-ooh-vo del-ish-ee-oh-so)
  • I am vegetarian: Soy vegetariano/a (soy veg-et-air-ee-an-oh/ah)
  • A table: Una mesa (oona me-sah)
  • A menu: Un menú (oon mey-noo)
  • A drink: Una bebida (oon-ah beh-beed-ah)
  • Beer: Cerveza (ser-vay-sah)
  • Red or white wine: Vino tinto or blanco (vee-noh teen-toh or blahn-coh)
  • Water: Agua (ahg-wah)
  • A coffee: Un café (uhn cah-fey)
  • Sandwich: Torta (tore-tah)
  • Burger: Hamburguesa (ham-burg-ess-ah)
  • Chicken: Pollo (poy-oh)
  • Spicy: Picante (pick-ant-ay)

If at the end of the day you consider staying longer in a Spanish-speaking place, we suggest you visit Alegre Spanish School and learn about our Spanish courses for tourists.