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Have you taken Spanish classes?, have you learned grammar in Spanish?, have you considered doing it?. Then you are with the best company. There are approximately 572 million Spanish speakers in the world today, and this number will continue to grow.

You have probably already learned that English grammar works very differently from Spanish grammar. Do you have problems with these rules? Don’t worry, we will help you.

Here are some of the most important grammar in Spanish rules when it comes to speaking Spanish.

Noun gender

In English, a noun can have a gender (he, she, her, him) but in Spanish, all nouns have a gender. This does not mean that Spanish speakers think that a chair is female, but the form of the noun indicates that it is female, unlike English.

When you combine a noun and an adjective, they must match. The noun controls the gender of the sentence. For example, if you want to talk about a red chair, the chair is feminine, therefore, the color takes a feminine form and is said red, on the other hand, if you talk about a bedroom, this noun is masculine, therefore, the color it would be red.

Check out this video to learn more about nouns and their genders:

Pluralization

Like gender, nouns and adjectives must agree in number, whether singular or plural. Unlike English, which can have a singular adjective alongside a plural noun.

Using the same examples as above, if you wanted to talk about red chairs, you would do so with both in the plural, unlike in English, which would be red chairs (color in the singular).

Contractions

The Spanish language only has two contractions.
Unlike English, contractions are not optional in Spanish. Writing “to him” instead of “to” is considered a misspelling.

Examples:

  • I go to the gym (wrong)
  • I go to the gym (correct)
  • I come from the future (wrong)
  • I come from the future (correct)

Here is a video to understand more about these contractions:

Adjectives come after the noun (usually)

This may seem very strange to English speakers, since, in English sentences, adjectives are always put before nouns.

If you want to write that someone has a green house, they do not put green house as they would in English, but “green house”. This is a very important rule in Spanish grammar, and it is one of the first habits that must be changed when we are learning Spanish.

Don’t worry if you don’t understand it the first time, over time it will be easier for you to get used to these grammatical structures.

If you have doubts about this topic, check the following video: